Print this page
2015-11-19

Volunteers Meeting: Discussing Elections in Argentina

Written by
Rate this item
(0 votes)

 

One of the unique features about being a volunteer with Voluntario Global is the sense of family. The coordinators of the organization truly value the relationship made with volunteers from all over the world and how important it is to recognize their commitment to making a difference in Buenos Aires. Aside from an occasional planned event to take a tour of Teatro Colon or playing futbol, each month volunteers are invited to the center office in Congresso on Avenida de Mayo to celebrate various accomplishments of the organization, volunteers and the projects they serve. During these meetings, volunteers have the opportunity to meet other volunteers as well as talk about anything from culture to politics.

Last week, I was fortunate to participate in “La Reunion de Voluntarios” (Volunteers Meeting). It was nice to finally meet some of the volunteers I’ve heard about but never met in person. There were nine volunteers —some new, some seasoned, two coordinators, Valeria and Milena, and two members of Voluntario Global’s Youth Committee—. We engaged in topics like political systems and candidates running in the Elections in Argentina. If you don't know by now, Argentinians are very open to discuss almost anything and politics is a particular passionate subject for many porteños, especially now.

Some of the volunteers like me, who come from a ‘well-established’ democracy such as the United States of America, are not used to discussing politics without consequences. However, the differences in opinions and ideologies at “La Reunion de Voluntarios” was educational. We had a long two-hour chat about the different governments and political ideologies – Socialism, Communism, Liberalism, Democratic, Republican, Labor, etc, and of course the candidates, Daniel Scioli and Mauricio Macri, and their vision for the future of the country in terms of the economy, employment and international and domestic trade. At the close of our reunion, I felt enriched with a new understanding of the history, culture and political climate here in Argentina and that of other countries and the volunteers currently working with Voluntario Global.

Who knows what we'll discuss next month. Stay tuned!

 

Read 15504 times

Latest from Catherine Valero

Related items

Racism hasn’t Ended in South America, It has Grown

With the recent political manifestations in Bolivia that have polarized the country into two different bands, the ones that support and don’t support Evo Morales, racism between indigenous and non indigenous people has come to light in the country. Here’s a reflexion about this issue that can help us reflect about the ongoing racism towards our tribes and the indigenous people of our continent. 

 

Meet Udo and Manu, our new volunteers from Germany!

Udo and Manu are our most recent volunteers from Germany. While they are currently studying, they decided to take some time off school to come to Argentina and help its locals by volunteering with us. We talked to them about their current experience with us and made them a few questions. Here’s what they had to say.

Argentina without Hunger

Brief reflection of the Pacheco Community on the document "Argentina sin hambre".

Planet Earth is in Emergency and the Youth of Argentina Marches for its Future

In Argentina, thousands of people also joined this global strike and we walked from Plaza de Mayo to Congress to support and witness this important event.

Four-week Language Immersion Study Trip to England

This is an opportunity to maximize your English language skills by means of an immersion study trip.

Redefining Concepts in Terms of Solidarity Economy: Questions to be asked

From Pacheco Community, as well as from many social organizations, we believe that some terms and concepts must be questioned and resignified: economic growth, progress, development, just to mention a few.

The real side of La Boca: Part 2

This historical neighborhood, aside from distinguishing itself as one of the funding areas of Buenos Aires, holds in its history political activism, resistance and working class heroism. The alternative tour that Argentinian guide Nicolás Cancino does, offers a different view of the typical cheerful and tango esque side of la Boca.

The real side of La Boca: Part 1

La Boca is often known for its famous Caminito street and for having one of the most popular stadiums in the world, La Bombonera, but what many people don’t know is how this neighborhood originated and what goes beyond the couple of blocks filled with tourists and colorful houses. 

Login to post comments