2019-11-29

Interview with Lena, Volunteer at the Kindergarten

Written by
Rate this item
(0 votes)
Kindergarten in Buenos Aires Kindergarten in Buenos Aires Lena Martorana

Volunteer Lena, from New Zeland, share with us her volunteering experience in the kindergarten and tells us what she's learned living in the city of Buenos Aires.

Tell me about yourself, and your position in your project? 

I’m eighteen years old and volunteering over in Buenos Aires during my university break.  My project is with a kindergarten on the edge of the city, where I am five days a week to assist the teachers from 9am-12.30pm. Everyday when I arrive in the morning I play with the children either outside on the play area or in their classroom, helping to keep them entertained until lunch is ready at 11. I then help to feed them lunch and put them down for their nap at midday when I leave. 

Why did you decide to begin volunteering? And Why Buenos Aires?

I have always been an active volunteer back home within local organizations and I have also visited and helped to raise money for some international organizations in Asia. Its something I’m very passionate about, so I knew I would want to incorporate it somehow into my end of year trip. I chose Buenos Aires because I’d never been to South America before and it was where I was able to find a community based project to volunteer with, which is what I wanted to do. 

What have you enjoyed most about your time in Buenos Aires?

I’ve only been here a week so far but, with exception to spending time and playing with the children at the kindergarten, I’ve really enjoyed walking around the streets of Buenos Aires and seeing the colourful buildings and wall art everywhere.  

What have you enjoyed most about volunteering within Voluntario Global?

It has been very nice to meet the other volunteers and travel to spend time at their projects to see what else is going on. It’s been amazing to experience both the locals and the international volunteers working together for the same collective goal.  

Has anything surprised you during your time in Buenos Aires, personally or professionally? 

I wasn’t expecting politics to play as big as a role as it does. I walk past large protests and marches most days on my way back from my project and I never fails to amaze me just how many people get involved. 

What experiences will you take away with you?

Just all the little things! Like seeing how happy the children get when you’re blowing bubbles or learning how to plant different fruits and vegetables at the gardening project. 

Do you have any advice for volunteers planning on volunteering with Voluntario Global? And traveling to Buenos Aires?

Pick a project that you’re passionate about! It’s important that you enjoy what you’re doing and want to be there. 

See as much an Buenos Aires as you can, there’s so many lovely places and it’s worth seeing all of them. Don’t be afraid to ask for directions - everyone is really nice and happy to help. Oh and remember a rain jacket! It can get really hot but it can also rain a lot some days. 

Read 15179 times

Related items

Crèche Argentine (English version)

 

            The crèche is not just a place where your children are welcomed and cared for, it is an institution with a deep history and wonderful human values. Indeed, founded by women many years ago, it was a way for them to combine the useful with the pleasant, but above all it was a matter of necessity. Unable to look after children and earn money, they had to find a solution to both problems. So, by building their own crèche, they were able to keep an eye on the children but also develop a business. The beginnings were not easy, sometimes having to bring food from home to feed the children they were looking after because of the little money they had. But with ambition and courage they succeeded and now allow other women like them to do the same thing by getting a job as a teacher, cook or cleaner in the crèche and also to be able to drop off their children. Most of the women working in this institution are, in fact, accompanied by their respective children, sometimes even in the same class.

Voluntario Global Ambassador Arthur Vandeputte

Volunteering Project: I worked at an English school. Outside of the city center in Buenos Aires (Pablo Nogues)

June 2022

Volunteering at the early childhood development center: Jack's experience

On our way to El Alfarero, a small preschool on the southern border between Buenos Aires Ciudad and Buenos Aires Province, the two sides of industrial development exist in close proximity and stark contrast.

Neil's Tips: Argentina and the dollar

Coming to Argentina the first time, I had no idea how complicated the exchange rates and access to cash would be, if you don’t want to lose money!

BA GUIDE: How to feel more at home in the city

Getting to a new city can often be overwhelming, especially one as big as Buenos Aires! There were lots of things I did when I first got to the city to settle in, and some things that my friends did that I didn’t. From my own experience, and having spoken to them, I’ve compiled a guide of how to feel comfortable in the wonderful cosmopolitan metropolis that is the city of Buenos Aires.

How to Help When Things Seem a Bit Hopeless

In a time full of uncertainty, it can be hard not to feel despair as the news cycle makes the state of the world seem ever more desperate and beyond repair. This can be made worse by social media, which exposes us to (often unverified news) on a constant loop, making it very difficult to feel anything but anxious and powerless. Unfortunately these feelings, understandable as they are, stop us from taking action. The more dread we feel, the more paralysed we become and the less likely we are to mobilise. And whilst any one individual is unlikely to effect great change, there’s a whole lot that we can do together! That’s why volunteering can be a great way to get involved with a community, and break this cycle of feeling powerless. But sometimes it can be hard to know where to start, so I’ll share a few tips with you that have helped me:

Tips for being gluten free in Buenos Aires

When moving to a new country, or visiting it for a shorter period of time, it’s always good to know that you’ll be able to easily get food in line with your dietary requirements. In my experience, Buenos Aires is definitely a place where you can be celiac with relative ease. There are of course times when looking for gluten free food can be frustrating (as is the case in almost any country you go) but on the whole it’s probably close to the experience you’d have in any big European city. Here are my tips on how to eat (out and in) comfortably as a celiac in Buenos Aires.

Cultural Differences: Argentina & UK - Part II

This is part two of the cultural differences between the UK (where I’m from) and Argentina (where I’m living at the moment). Check out part one, also on this page!
Login to post comments